Video of Women’s Marchers High-Fiving Police in Atlanta Goes Viral

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Source: City of Atlanta Police/Facebook

Source: City of Atlanta Police/Facebook

On January 21, women all over the world made history marching in solidarity for their rights and freedoms — in peaceful protest to the 45th president of the United States. Atlanta, Georgia — which has seen a fair share of marches dating back to the civil rights movement — proudly participated in the Women’s March, and there is a heartwarming video with local police that is going viral.

Source: The Center/Twitter

Source: The Center/Twitter

The Atlanta police said an estimated 60,000 people took to the streets marching through downtown Atlanta. The Atlanta March for Social Justice and Women included members of underrepresented communities in Georgia. The march began at the Center for Civil and Human Rights and ventured to the Georgia State Capitol four hours later.

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Georgia congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis wrote on Twitter, “I know something about marching! Don’t let anybody turn you around!”

Even the police rejoiced in the protest by high-fiving the women as they passed by their barricades. The City of Atlanta Police Department posted a video of it to Facebook — and it has gone viral with over five million views.

In the video, the women can be seen enthusiastically going down the line of police saying, “thank you” with the police answering them with a high-five and “no problem.”

More subdued marchers settled for a handshake.

Source: City of Atlanta Police/Facebook

Source: City of Atlanta Police/Facebook

Among the 40,000 emojis of wows, loves and likes there were 49,506 shares and 1,300 comments chiming in such as, “Love our men and woman in blue!! This is what a peaceful protest is about. Respecting each other!”

In the history of marches, the Women’s March became the largest one-day protest to date in the United States. University of Connecticut professor Jeremy Pressman kept a running total of crowd estimates across the United States in a Google spreadsheet. His tallies estimated over four million women marched nationwide in cities like Chicago, Boston, Denver, New York, Washington, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Madison, Pittsburgh, Nashville and St. Paul.

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