Snow Falls in the Sahara Desert for the First Time in 37 Years

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Sahara Desert

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

It’s a Christmas miracle! Or perhaps just the ramifications of climate change. Well, whatever the cause, it’s certainly a sight to see. For the first time since 1979 (37 years) snow fell in the Sahara Desert on December 19.

The people of the quaint Algerian town of Ain Sefra were stunned when they witnessed snow falling over the desert. Billed as “The Gateway to the Desert,” Ain Sefra is located about 1,000 meters above sea level and is surrounded by the Atlas Mountains. Back in 1979, the snow fall lasted for just 30 minutes. This time, however, the snow stuck to the ground for an entire day.

Photos of the surreal event were taken by amateur photographer Karim Bouchetata, according to CNN.

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Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

The Sahara desert is one of the world’s hottest places, reaching a staggering temperature of 122 degrees Fahrenheit during its hottest season. It’s also one of the driest places, with rainfall rarely, if ever, occurring throughout the year.

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

According to the Daily Mail, Bouchetata said “everyone was stunned to see snow falling on the desert.

“It looked amazing as the snow settled on the sand and made a great set of photos,” he continued.

This isn’t the first time snow has appeared in odd places. In 2013, Egypt made headlines when it experienced its first snow in over 100 years.

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

Source: Daily Mail/Karim Bouchetata

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